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  • MO1L4815 250px Today we welcomed our annual gathering of year 13 students in fancy dress.
    The event marks the end of their formal International Baccalaureate Diploma lessons

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  • ConcertMarch17 250px Congratulations to all who performed as part of Our Choral Concert Evening on Tuesday 28 March 2016 at St. Peter’s Church, Broadstairs. The audience were

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  • IMG 9745 250px On Wednesday 29 March members of the choir and GCSE music students descended on London to take part in a movement and voice workshop at

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  • IMG 0419 250px The House Music Cup Competition took place on Friday 17 March and we welcomed guest judges Mark Smith and Louise van der Linden.
    Thank you

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  • school front 250px The Dane Court Grammar School Parents Association's monthly boot fairs usually take place at the school from 6:30am on the second Saturday of each month with

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  • RIMG2140 "The reason I chose Dane Court."
    "Can I stay another week?"
    "Dane Court's best trip." 

    Over the years, students partipating in our annual visit to

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Sixth Form Prospectus 2017

Running a marathon to raise awareness of Action Duchenne

action duchenne marathon april16 250pxSixth former Alice recently took part in Brighton marathon with the aim of raising awareness and much needed funds for her chosen charity, Action Duchenne.

Action Duchnne. initially called Parent Project UK, was set up in 2001 by Nick Catlin and Dr Janet Hoskin, after their son Saul was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. The charity was the first organisation in the UK dedicated exclusively to Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy and, with the help and support of friends and supporters and other Duchenne families, developed into a national organisation.
Alice explained ‘When I first started training and fundraising for the marathon I was rather anxious but keen to get started. I began my fundraising by starting up a Just Giving page and spreading the word via social media. However I soon realised that I was going to need to do some kind of event to make up the £500 I planned to raise before running the marathon so I decided to organise a quiz night at my school and shared the sponsorship money with the David Shepard Wildlife Foundation as it is a charity that Mr White is a part of and he helped a lot with the running of the event. I also did a number of assemblies at school to raise awareness about the illness and about what I was doing to help raise money for the charity.

I found the marathon a real challenge and at the start line I was very nervous but with such a positive atmosphere I was able to cross the finish line with a grin on my face and have a strong sense of pride for myself and everyone else that had completed the run. I managed to complete the marathon in a respectable 4 hours 37 minutes and 4 seconds and have raised more the £1300 for the charity. I hope to run another marathon in a few years but would like to concentrate on my studies for the time being.’

Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a common genetic disorder diagnosed in childhood, affecting approximately 1 in every 3,500 male births (around 2500 people have DMD in the UK). To find out more about the charity, Action Duchenne, or to donate to the help support sufferers of the condition please visit: http://www.actionduchenne.org/

Big Bang at Discovery Park

big bang discovery 250pxOn Friday 18 March a group of Year 7 students from Dane Court attended The Big Bang event at Discovery Park in Sandwich. The Big Bang was a celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) for young people. The show aimed to highlight how many rewarding and exciting opportunities there are in STEM related careers and further education.

BBC School Report 2016

bbc news report 250pxOn Thursday 10 March 2016 Dane Court students took part in BBC News School Report.

Oxford and Cambridge Offers for Dane Court Students

DaneCourtOxbridge2016 250pxThree of Dane Court’s sixth form students have been offered a place to study at Oxford and two at Cambridge in the autumn, pending their results.  The entry procedure is a demanding one:  students are required to meet not only the highest of academic standards but then they are rigorously interviewed in their chosen subject by college academics. ‘Sincerest congratulations’ to these successful applicants has come from Executive head teacher Paul Luxmoore, who said: ‘These brilliant students have won offers against increasingly strong competition, both nationally and internationally, across a broad spectrum of subjects. To have almost half of our applicants winning places to study at these world class universities is a wonderful reward, not only for the talent and hard work of our students, but it is also an endorsement of the expertise of our highly committed staff. This is continued evidence of the culture of rising aspirations in our school community and also in Thanet’

Abi Baker left Dane Court in July 2015 and received 43 points: she has been offered an unconditional place to study Veterinary Science at Gonville and Caius, Cambridge. Abi is passionate about the prospect of becoming a vet and the course provides the broad range that Abi finds appealing.

James Howard has been successful in his application to study Geography at Mansfield College, Oxford; he is a talented geographer who has excelled in his studies at Dane Court.

Amy Napier has received an offer to study Natural science at Jesus College, Cambridge: her passion is languages and her contribution to the life of the school in her role as Head Girl has been enormous.

Alex Payne has been offered a place to further his study of Biological Sciences at Somerville, Oxford and is looking forward to the challenge of this demanding course

Alice Rawson has accepted an offer to study Biochemistry at Wadham College, Oxford: Alice is a gifted scientist and her lifetime scientific interest has been endorsed by the opportunity to study at one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

Heads of Sixth Form, Annie Hale and Nilufa Razzaq said, ‘These students capture much of the spirit of Dane Court. They combine intellectual power and a terrific passion for learning with a broader enthusiasm and energy for life beyond the classroom. They have worked really hard, but their success is also a great testimony to the excellent teaching of our colleagues and to the high expectation that we have of all of our students’

Headteacher, Andrew Fowler  said, of those academically gifted students who were unsuccessful,  ‘To have courage to apply, to put in the extra work required in support of your application and then to see others succeed where you have not, takes great strength and determination. Perhaps it is some consolation that it is often from disappointment that we learn most in life. I was extremely impressed this year by those students who were unsuccessful in their application to Cambridge and Oxford. It takes courage to put yourself forward in the knowledge that so many students with the highest predictions are rejected by Cambridge alone. Even to apply is a daunting prospect.’

Table tennis qualifiers

ttennis qual jan16 250pxCongratulations to Dane Court under 16 girls table tennis team who on Sunday 31 January won two and drew two of their four matches to finish runners up in the South East Zonal Tournament in London. This means they have qualified for the Southern Regional Final in Bristol on 20 March 2016.

We were the youngest team there as all the girls, Angel, Annabel, Catherine, Grace and Tayla are currently in year 9.

Thank you to Mr Wallace for driving us there and back plus encouraging and supporting the team.

Parents Emotional First Aid

efa logo 250pxEveryone knows you’re a parent... but do you remember who you are!

When we become parents our priorities change, we take on the responsibility of another little person and we tend to get so focused on this we forget we are still a person in our own right.

Parents’ emotional first aid will help you re-discover you!

We sometimes feel that we must be the only person in the world feeling the way we feel. Parents’ emotional first aid will help you recognise that we all share similar thoughts, feelings, emotions and behaviours to varying degrees.

The course helps to create strategies for our anxieties; identify the stress factors in our everyday lives; gain a better understanding of ourselves and promote a healthier sense of our own wellbeing. It is delivered by trained facilitators over 6 sessions, each lasting half a day.

Dates and location of future courses are to be confirmed.
Further information about Parents Emotional First aid is available at: http://www.emotionalfirstaid.co.uk/course-parents

If you are interested in this course please contact Mrs Brissenden at the school.

Chemistry at Work

ChemistryAtWork 250pxThe long awaited day of chemistry had arrived. I stood gathered outside the minibus with nothing but my lust for science and some jam sandwiches in my bag. The coach trip was long but scenic, with lush British countryside and a few hamlets along the way.

We pulled up at the school. It looked like something off a fantasy novel, like that Harry Potter one I picked up at Waterstones. We rolled up the long drive, every one of us dwarfed by the large football and rugby pitches. We managed to catch a glimpse of the school building; it was grand and old fashioned, with a gigantic wooden door. After 10 minutes of getting lost we had managed to crawl into a parking space and disembark our vehicle. Everyone mustered in the car park and watched in awe as five tennis courts came into view. I started to wonder whether my jam sandwiches were any match for the cooked lobster that they may serve at this school. We were led into a glass hall where we were given badges with our names on. I looked at my badge and realised that they had spelt my name wrong! Now at this point I had already realised that I spell my name absurdly and I carried on unaffected. We were shuffled from courtyard to courtyard and through a library until we eventually reached the theatre, where the lecture would take place. We then sat down in the upper rows.

Our first lecture was about carbon structures. We were taught about the structures of carbon on a molecular level: How graphite is made up of carbon sheets whilst diamond is made of a more pyramidic structure. Afterwards, we were taught that people have broken down the graphite sheets into a single sheet, known as graphene (which won the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics). Graphene is a sheet of interconnected hexagons of carbon atoms. By adding a few pentagons between the hexagons, this structure can be shaped into something with the same geometry as a football. This is called Buckminsterfullerene or a ‘Buckyball’ (named after the architect who first used these structures: Buckminster Fuller). We also learnt that this type of structure has been used for architecture all around the world. They were used in the construction of the Eden Project and Science World, Vancouver, plus many more.

After the lecture we were invited for a complimentary lunch, which we gobbled down before going exploring in the adjacent courtyard. Our next lecture was the ‘Science Behind Breaking Bad’.

Once again, we sat down in the upper rows of the theatre. I grabbed my trusty pencil and prized notepad and without warning we dived straight into the world of Breaking Bad. We discovered that methamphetamine was created by the Japanese in the late 1800s as a stimulant for soldiers. It was also used in the 1950s as a slimming treatment. We also learnt about:

  • Phosphorus and how it reacts with water vapour to form the mustard gas and other infamous gasses used in the First World War. In Breaking Bad, Walter White produced phosphine gas on the spot to poison the drug bandits trying to steal his precious recipe for methamphetamine.
  • Mercury fulminate is a very unstable explosive. If triggered by heat, shock or friction it will explode. Walter uses a small vial of mercury fulminate to create an explosion in an encounter with a drug lord and threatens a much larger one with a whole bag of mercury fulminate if he doesn’t pay up.
  • The thermite reaction was used for welding tram tracks together in the 1890s. The reaction reaches temperatures of up to 2500 ˚C. Walter sets a bag of thermite reactants alight to trigger the reaction and melt open a locked door of a warehouse to steal precious supplies.

After we had indulged ourselves with enough scientific knowledge to satisfy a small laboratory, we headed home.

For more on the chemistry of Breaking Bad, have a look at The Royal Society of Chemistry website

 

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Looping the Loop
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Zambia 2016
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