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  • ttennis qual jan16 250px Congratulations to Dane Court under 16 girls table tennis team who on Sunday 31 January won two and drew two of their four matches to

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  • MO1L0239 250px This is an important time for our Year 11 students as they consider their options for post-16 study. During the first two weeks of February

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  • efa logo 250px Everyone knows you’re a parent... but do you remember who you are!

    When we become parents our priorities change, we take on the responsibility of

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  • microbe 250px For your chance to win up to £100 cash, simply design a poster showing;

    "how microbes work for us by interacting with their surroundings and,

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  • ChemistryAtWork 250px The long awaited day of chemistry had arrived. I stood gathered outside the minibus with nothing but my lust for science and some jam sandwiches

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  • bbc news report 250px On Thursday 10 March 2016 Dane Court students will join forces with King Ethelbert school students for BBC School Report.
    Stay tuned to see our

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Table tennis qualifiers

ttennis qual jan16 250pxCongratulations to Dane Court under 16 girls table tennis team who on Sunday 31 January won two and drew two of their four matches to finish runners up in the South East Zonal Tournament in London. This means they have qualified for the Southern Regional Final in Bristol on 20 March 2016.

We were the youngest team there as all the girls, Angel, Annabel, Catherine, Grace and Tayla are currently in year 9.

Thank you to Mr Wallace for driving us there and back plus encouraging and supporting the team.

IB options for year 11

MO1L0239 250pxThis is an important time for our Year 11 students as they consider their options for post-16 study. During the first two weeks of February we will be interviewing all students in the year group for places in our Sixth Form and this will also be an opportunity to help them navigate choices for future careers. It is not in the least uncommon for students to have no idea, at this stage, of what they might want to do in the future, so it is important that they work to their strengths and keep their options open.

There is a wealth of advice and information available and it is always a good idea to become familiar with the UCAS (University and Colleges Admissions Services) website if a student is considering Higher Education.

The documents below outline some things to be considering and there are also helpful links to UCAS and university advice. As always, please contact us if you have any questions.

pdf How to approach making your IB subject choices 2016 (411 KB)

pdf University course subject requirements 2016 (9 KB)

Parents Emotional First Aid

efa logo 250pxEveryone knows you’re a parent... but do you remember who you are!

When we become parents our priorities change, we take on the responsibility of another little person and we tend to get so focused on this we forget we are still a person in our own right.

Parents’ emotional first aid will help you re-discover you!

We sometimes feel that we must be the only person in the world feeling the way we feel. Parents’ emotional first aid will help you recognise that we all share similar thoughts, feelings, emotions and behaviours to varying degrees.

The course helps to create strategies for our anxieties; identify the stress factors in our everyday lives; gain a better understanding of ourselves and promote a healthier sense of our own wellbeing. It is delivered by trained facilitators over 6 sessions, each lasting half a day.

Dates and location of future courses are to be confirmed.
Further information about Parents Emotional First aid is available at: http://www.emotionalfirstaid.co.uk/course-parents

If you are interested in this course please contact Mrs Brissenden at the school.

Year 7 microbes competition

microbe 250pxFor your chance to win up to £100 cash, simply design a poster showing;

"how microbes work for us by interacting with their surroundings and, sometimes, with each other”.

Hurry! Closing date for the competition is 29 February 2016.
  pdf Check out the flyer for more details (163 KB) .

You will be given one lesson and one homework to help you do this. The best posters will be entered in the official MiSAC competition by your biology teacher.

BBC School Report 2016

bbc news report 250pxOn Thursday 10 March 2016 Dane Court students will join forces with King Ethelbert school students for BBC School Report.
Stay tuned to see our work go live at 1600 GMT on the News Day.

BBC School Report 2015

BBC School Report 2014

More information on the BBC website .

Kent Mountain Centre 2015

RIMG1073 250pxOn the last day of the Autunm half term holiday 36 lucky year nine students embarked on our annual trip to the mountains and sea cliffs of North Wales.

Chemistry at Work

ChemistryAtWork 250pxThe long awaited day of chemistry had arrived. I stood gathered outside the minibus with nothing but my lust for science and some jam sandwiches in my bag. The coach trip was long but scenic, with lush British countryside and a few hamlets along the way.

We pulled up at the school. It looked like something off a fantasy novel, like that Harry Potter one I picked up at Waterstones. We rolled up the long drive, every one of us dwarfed by the large football and rugby pitches. We managed to catch a glimpse of the school building; it was grand and old fashioned, with a gigantic wooden door. After 10 minutes of getting lost we had managed to crawl into a parking space and disembark our vehicle. Everyone mustered in the car park and watched in awe as five tennis courts came into view. I started to wonder whether my jam sandwiches were any match for the cooked lobster that they may serve at this school. We were led into a glass hall where we were given badges with our names on. I looked at my badge and realised that they had spelt my name wrong! Now at this point I had already realised that I spell my name absurdly and I carried on unaffected. We were shuffled from courtyard to courtyard and through a library until we eventually reached the theatre, where the lecture would take place. We then sat down in the upper rows.

Our first lecture was about carbon structures. We were taught about the structures of carbon on a molecular level: How graphite is made up of carbon sheets whilst diamond is made of a more pyramidic structure. Afterwards, we were taught that people have broken down the graphite sheets into a single sheet, known as graphene (which won the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics). Graphene is a sheet of interconnected hexagons of carbon atoms. By adding a few pentagons between the hexagons, this structure can be shaped into something with the same geometry as a football. This is called Buckminsterfullerene or a ‘Buckyball’ (named after the architect who first used these structures: Buckminster Fuller). We also learnt that this type of structure has been used for architecture all around the world. They were used in the construction of the Eden Project and Science World, Vancouver, plus many more.

After the lecture we were invited for a complimentary lunch, which we gobbled down before going exploring in the adjacent courtyard. Our next lecture was the ‘Science Behind Breaking Bad’.

Once again, we sat down in the upper rows of the theatre. I grabbed my trusty pencil and prized notepad and without warning we dived straight into the world of Breaking Bad. We discovered that methamphetamine was created by the Japanese in the late 1800s as a stimulant for soldiers. It was also used in the 1950s as a slimming treatment. We also learnt about:

  • Phosphorus and how it reacts with water vapour to form the mustard gas and other infamous gasses used in the First World War. In Breaking Bad, Walter White produced phosphine gas on the spot to poison the drug bandits trying to steal his precious recipe for methamphetamine.
  • Mercury fulminate is a very unstable explosive. If triggered by heat, shock or friction it will explode. Walter uses a small vial of mercury fulminate to create an explosion in an encounter with a drug lord and threatens a much larger one with a whole bag of mercury fulminate if he doesn’t pay up.
  • The thermite reaction was used for welding tram tracks together in the 1890s. The reaction reaches temperatures of up to 2500 ˚C. Walter sets a bag of thermite reactants alight to trigger the reaction and melt open a locked door of a warehouse to steal precious supplies.

After we had indulged ourselves with enough scientific knowledge to satisfy a small laboratory, we headed home.

For more on the chemistry of Breaking Bad, have a look at The Royal Society of Chemistry website

 

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Kent Mountain Centre 2015
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Sir Ian McKellen visits
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